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Pine trees

These are two water colour sketches of pine trees in Aylestone Hall gardens. I’ve tried to do this in Cézanne’s style, using small planes of colour and not painting wet in wet, but letting each coat dry.

pine trees 002 pine trees 004

Also this week I did a watercolour copied from a photo in the paper. It was of a bombed street in  Homs in Syria.

homs 01

 

 

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Learning from Cézanne

copy from Cezanne's Group of Trees 1900 water colour
copy from Cezanne’s Group of Trees 1900
water colour

I’m immersing myself in Cézanne at the moment. This project started with a visit to an exhibition of the Pearlman Collection at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. The exhibition included many Cézanne watercolours.  I love Cézanne anyway, and to be in a gallery with so many, and so close-up, was quite thrilling. The best exhibition experience I’ve had. I jotted a few notes about his watercolours:

  • he uses white space / unpainted ground as a positive part of the picture
  • he uses small patches of colour, overlaid, to build an effect; wet on dry
  • the colours are jewel-like and not muddy
  • these marks form undulations of cool and warm colours
  • he draws loosely in pencil and these lines are an integral part of the picture
  • he reinforces the form with loose outlines in paint, no hard edges
  • he suggests foliage but never paints individual leaves
  • he paints with vigour
  • composition is crucial, yet understated
copy of Large Pine Study 1890 watercolour
copy of Large Pine Study 1890
watercolour

I’ve found an excellent book called – Cézanne’s Composition by Erle Loran. He founded the Berkley Group and was a tutor to Diebenkorn.  The book is new to me, but it is well-known and well regarded. (Although Roy Lichtenstein sent it up, but that doesn’t put me off). It provides an analysis and explanation of Cézanne’s approach which is eye-opening.  I  am looking at an exhibition catalogue called Finished Unfinished Cézanne which is also excellent at explaining his technique. So –  now is time to put the theory into practice.

I’ve started with some sketches of a pear tree in our garden:

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I’ve just finished a still life in watercolour. It doesn’t look much like a Cézanne, but it different to anything I’ve done before.

still life sketch in water-colour
still life sketch in water-colour

I’ve done some studies of some pine trees in Aylestone  Hall gardens recently, so when the rain stops, I’ll go back out with my watercolours and give them the Cézanne treatment.

 

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Cote D’Azur

I liked this picture in the paper because of the play of light and shade and hot and cool colours, so I’ve had a go at painting it.

photo in paper
photo in paper

Stage one was to paint quickly and very loosely.

first effort in acrylics
first effort in acrylics

Then I added some more dark areas.

stage two
stage two

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think you need a lot of skill and dexterity and confidence  to make this free approach look interesting. This just looks clumsy to me.  Then I tried a watercolour version.

watercolour
watercolour

The final version, below, has more detail. I’ve worked over this painting about 5 times so now is the time to stop.

finished version
finished version

 

 

 

 

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Sketchbook

I’ve just finished a sketchbook – here are some selected drawings from it.

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still life project

Here is some of the work I’ve done relating to a course taken at Embrace Arts, Leicester. The topic was still life. We were asked to select unimportant objects. I explored a few different selections including things from the garden shed, small items taken from my mother’s desk and some pots and a bottle.  I discovered Morandi, I thought more about Bonnard and use of shadows, and explored using cool and warm colours together more. I’m pleased with what I’ve done during the course and I began to stray out of my comfort zone a little.

 

 

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Lime Trees and Autumn Leaves

I photographed some leaves and then painted  a colour grid. Thought the colours were surprisingly spring like!

Autumn Leaves
Autumn Leaves
colour grid
colour grid
leaves on the grid
leaves on the grid
messing about with colours
messing about with colours

Autumnal lime trees have a wonderful contrast between the dark branches and yellow leaves. Particularly striking against the blue sky. So I took a few photos….

lime 007

lime 009

Also did several pastel sketches and watercolours – trying to capture the intensity of the leaves and branches.

autumn leaves 005 autumn leaves 001 autumn leaves 002 autumn leaves 003 lime 02 lime 04 lime 03